Escaping Skeletons

Oaxaca de Juárez has skeletons in their closets. Large numbers of them all over the city have been escaping and appearing as Day of the Dead decorations.

Día de Muertos or Día de los Muertos is a holiday celebrated on October 31st, and the 1st and 2nd of November. It originated and is mostly observed in Mexico.

Oaxaca is a colorful city that becomes even more colorful for Dia de los Muertos with colorful decorations including paper flags, orange marigolds, and orange, purple and black ribbons.
The Mexican marigold is the traditional flower used to honor the dead.
Decorating the doorways to businesses.
Orange and magenta colored fresh flowers are typically used in the Dia de Muertos decorations.
The Dia de Muertos celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed.

Although associated with the Catholic celebrations of All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day, Dia de los Muertos has a much less solemn tone and is portrayed as a holiday of joyful celebration remembering loved ones who have died rather than mourning.

The majestic Metropolitan Cathedral of Oaxaca was started in 1535.
The main sanctuary was filled with fresh flower arrangements.
I was completely stunned by the huge amount of gorgeous flower arrangements and their fragrance in this small chapel in the cathedral.
Individual flower arrangements make up this special Dia de Muertos display to remember Jesus Christ’s death.
Close up of one section of flowers.
The state of Oaxaca, Mexico. Oaxaca de Juárez is the capital and most populous city of the state of Oaxaca (pronounced Wah-HAH-kah.)

If you’ve read it this far, thank you! Coming soon are many more colorful photos and stories from Oaxaca de Juárez, Oaxaca. Hasta luego!

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