An American Toddler in Paris

I was surprised by the strange and unusual emotion I was feeling. I had just dropped off my family at the airport. This time, I was the one staying home; they were traveling. The shoe was on the other foot.

My 2-year-old granddaughter was going with her parents to France!

An American toddler in Paris.

I was happy for them! I loved seeing their photos on the shared thread and I anxiously awaited each day’s “Trip Report.” I learned that travel with a toddler is totally different.

They were gone a month: visited Provence and then settled down for 3 weeks in a Parisian AirBnB apartment.

The Toddler’s Guide to International Travel

The fashionable toddler likes to accessorize.

Toddlers make friends.

Toddlers play with sticks and stones.

Toddlers all around the world want to eat “Kid’s Meals.”

Toddlers take naps in awesome locations.

Toddlers take time to talk to the animals.

Toddlers like to ride carousels.

Toddlers like to climb things and splash in rain puddles.

Toddler girls are ecstatic with new clothes!

Toddlers like train rides.

Toddlers like macarons.

Toddlers want to play in each and every park they come across. Tucked in neighborhoods all across the city of Paris are many wonderful parks, most with sand pits, including one within site of the Eiffel Tower. Many pleasant hours can be passed playing in the parks.

Toddlers like Disneyland Paris. Parents do too!

Toddlers love meeting their favorite characters – especially Minnie Mouse.

Toddlers love the Eiffel Tower. A month later, this toddler continues to talk about the Eiffel Tower – especially the sparkly light show each evening. Families are out and about Paris very late each night.

Toddlers get rides in the airport. Welcome home!

A Parents’ Guide to International Travel with Toddlers

Be flexible.

Picnic or eat at outdoor cafes.

Don’t forsake nap time.

Slow down. Don’t sightsee every day.

Forget museums and churches! Visit parks and gardens instead.

Take turns staying with the toddler while the other visits those don’t miss places of interest.

Next time: Taking a nanny (or grandma) would be a great help!

Let’s be real. Traveling with a toddler isn’t easy. There is a reason age 2 is called “The Terrible Twos.” Toddlers won’t always cooperate when it comes to walking or riding in the stroller. There are melt-downs. Temper your expectations, slow down, soak up the ambience and views, people watch – and enjoy each moment together.

One extra special benefit that comes from traveling with children is how they provide opportunities to interact and talk with locals.

My Happy American Family in Paris.

Grandma’s like showing off photos of their grandchildren!

Happy Travels…

6 responses to “An American Toddler in Paris

  1. Nice photo exposé of Evora!
    The emotion you describe at being left behind evoked memories of the time Mom and Dad left for South America. That feeling is partially responsible for the love of travel that I have had.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My favorite blog post yet! 😉

    Maybe this will inspire others parents to travel with their toddlers! But having realistic expectations is key. And being flexible. And not feeling like you missed out if you didn’t get to see “everything” – because that’s not really the point of traveling with our children, is it?

    Where will Evora (and her sister) take us in 2020?? I’m not sure if this Mama is ready to go back across the ocean quite yet. Time will tell. 😂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m proud of you for attempting it! You will have to chance to see all you missed when you return someday. I think maybe you’ll be ready to go again in late 2020 – when we can all go together – for Evora’s 3rd international trip and baby sister’s first! At least I hope so! 🥰

      Like

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